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Hi! I'm mostly here for conversations, reflections, and geekery around subjects that catch my fancy. Recently that orbits technology (esp , data services, networks), music (writ large), languages (esp ancient Greek), autism, and general silliness. Structural protection for the marginalized is close to my heart, but I've learned I need to engage gently to stay healthy. I try to keep shitposting to a minimum.

I co-administer .

In other news, recommendations welcome for more recent rockabilly revival music with more modern lyric sensibilities around. i mean. life? everything? I'm sharply reminded of how well the fifties didn't age.

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I'm listening to classic rockabilly for some reason this morning and... Is Skatearound Sue a name yet? Because it definitely should be.

okay but hear me out. microwave but it plays a user-customizable mp3 when it's done.

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we need to talk about the "extremely annoying skeptic preteen nerd boy" to "extremely annoying pagan goth girl 20-something" pipeline

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anyone know any data archivists that might have a copy of the Intel OpenCL Runtime for Linux, version 14.2? the link on intel's website does not work and i cannot find it elsewhere

the 2013 sdk would probably also suffice (i have a filename for that one, "intel_sdk_for_ocl_applications_2013_xe_sdk_3.0.67279_x64.tgz")

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The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy was published 42 years ago today.

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itpol, fascism 

The neofascists in Italy riled up a mob under the guise of protesting the vaccine, then used it as cover to first attempt to rush into Parliament and the seat of government at Palazzo Chigi, then they pivoted to assaulting and breaking into national union CGIL’s headquarters, in this latter case unimpeded by cops. ilpost.it/2021/10/11/scontri-r

Delbert McClinton 

And I guess I don't really have a summary. I guess if there's any, it's that sometimes the inner workings of music industry success look like total magic or plain chance from outside the relevant genre.

For me it feels less magical for pop music, and I'm not sure whether that's because of the genre's general popularity or because I happen to know more about it. But that just-below-the-surface working of other genres? That's a kind of magic that I find just fascinating.

/fin

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Delbert McClinton 

I've only done surface-level internet research on this today, and modern blues music is definitely not an area I know well. So from my position on the outside it looks like he's been recording for five decades, had a random rock hit out of nowhere in the 80s, had a flash of success in the early nineties, and then was basically invisible until the late nineties when he suddenly got famous and has stayed there.

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Delbert McClinton 

And since then he's been all over the blues world! I don't follow that world, so perhaps someone else around here can add some context that I don't have. But apparently his next album Nothing Personal released in 2001 and won the 2002 Grammy for Best Contemporary Blues Album, and he won Contemporary Blues Album again in 2006 and Traditional Blues Album in 2020. He's been nominated for eight more, and seven of his albums hit number two or one on the Billboard Blues Album charts.

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Delbert McClinton 

And then--out of nowhere as far as I can tell--in 1997 it all just came together for him. I haven't found what precipitated it. He'd been previously nominated for the Contemporary Blues Album Grammy in 1990. Presumably that's what got him on Raitt's duet the next year. But while his five albums from 1993-95 went largely ignored by the media, his 1997 album One of the Fortunate Few suddenly hit number 2 on Billboard's Blues Albums chart.

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Delbert McClinton 

McClinton's next big appearance on the scene was only a year later: His song "Weatherman" was used as the opening credit song of Harold Ramis's 1993 hit Groundhod Day. The movie released a soundtrack, but as far as I can tell no singles were ever released. McClinton included the song on his self-titled release later that year, from which no singles were released, and the song mostly disappeared. Despite a few releases McClinton went largely unnoticed for the next few years.

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Delbert McClinton 

The song itself was a cover: It was written and previously released in 1988 as "Good Man Monologue" by Womack & Womack on their album Conscience. That album didn't catch on at home in the US--their only success here was an R&B top 40 in 84--but apparently the single Teardrops was massively popular around the world. "Good Man Monologue" was released in 89 as the album's sixth single. It went largely unnoticed until Raitt covered it with McClinton a couple years later.

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Delbert McClinton 

His first Grammy came in 1992: It was a duet with Bonnie Raitt. I haven't found what brought them together. The song "Good Man, Good Woman" was on Raitt's 1991 album Luck of the Draw. That album was her big crossover into mainstream rock, and the source of her big hit at the time "Something to Talk About." "Good Man, Good Woman" wasn't released as a single, but it beat out Jane's Addiction, R.E.M., Tom Petty, and Queensrÿche (!!) for the Grammy for Best Rock Duo or Group Vocal.

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music wonkery: Delbert McClinton 

I'm going through the 80s Hot 100 with a sweetie, and today we did Delbert McClinton's "Giving It Up for Your Love," which was released sometime in 1980 and peaked at number 8 in February 1981.

Technically he's a one-hit wonder: The song was his only top 40 on the Hot 100. If I'm honest I don't remember the song. I also don't know his other work, but while researching him I learned that unlike other one-hit wonders he's actually won four Grammys, well after 1981.

Oh hey I meant to drop a link on that post. Spectral analysis, psychoacoustics, and vocal music pedagogy. Yum! youtu.be/Ud3yHDiP42o

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In other nerdery, if anyone else here is hot for acoustic spectral analysis, the psychoacoustics of vocal music perception, and vocal pedagogy, you might be interested in the academic work of Ian Howell. I've recently learned about him, and while I haven't yet read his published works I've been absolutely devouring interviews. I am _very_ excited.

Hey linguistics nerds. I'm curious about some prosody I hear in English spoken with I think an Indian accent, not sure from which language. When a sentence ends in "the" and a noun or short phrase, I sometimes hear pitch rise dramatically during "the," then a long pause before the end of the phrase returning to the base pitch. I'm curious if this maps to prosodic elements in their other languages, if it's some cultural marker, or perhaps just other context. Not sure what to Google. Any ideas?

ngl the new ministry album released yesterday is more politically relevant than i've heard lately from other aging bands. youtu.be/apWiIgF1-Ho

normal people: 2, 4, 6, 8, ,10, 12, 14, 16
me, an gamer: 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 20

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